Sports Medicine in Austin: The Push-Up Test

It’s time for another Austin-area sports medicine 101 class!

As we discussed last time (LINK), the push-up is a great indicator of a person’s upper body strength and endurance. The push-up test is a simple test to show you what your approximate fitness level is based on the number of push-ups you can complete under the given guidelines. Check it out, do the test, and let us know your results!

Standard Push-up Testing:

  • As before any fitness testing, don’t forget to warm up first.
  • Assume the typical push-up position with your hands shoulder-width apart and elbows fully extended.
  • Lower your upper body so your elbows bend to 90 degrees, all while keeping your entire body (toes to shoulders) in a straight line.
  • Push your upper body back up to where you started, which is the completion of one repetition.
  • Continue in this manner, completing as many reps as possible while keeping form.
  • Tally up the number of push-ups completed.

Modified Push-up Testing (for those with less relative upper body strength):

  • As before any fitness testing, don’t forget to warm up first.
  • Assume the typical modified push-up position with your hands shoulder-width apart and elbows fully extended.
  • Drop your hips, moving hands forward until a straight line is formed from your knees up to your shoulders, and then lower your upper body so your elbows bend to 90 degrees.
  • Push your upper body back up to where you started, which is the completion of one repetition.
  • Continue in this manner, completing as many reps as possible while keeping form.
  • Tally up the number of push-ups completed.

Once you’ve finished your testing, take a look at the chart below to see how your results compare to the average for your age and gender. If you’re training, it’s recommended to do the push-up test every 8 to 12 weeks to review your progress.

Source:

McArdle W.D. et al, Essentials of Exercise Physiology, 2000, 2006. Published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Push Up Fitness Test Results

Men Age: 20-29 Age: 30-39 Age: 40-49 Age: 50-59 Age: 60+
Excellent 54 or more 44 or more 39 or more 34 or more 29 or more
Good 45-54 35-44 30-39 25-34 20-29
Average 35-44 24-34 20-29 15-24 10-19
Poor 20-34 15-24 12-19 8-14 5-9
Very Poor 20 or fewer 15 or fewer 12 or fewer 8 or fewer 5 or fewer
Women Age: 20-29 Age: 30-39 Age: 40-49 Age: 50-59 Age: 60+
Excellent 48 or more 39 or more 34 or more 29 or more 19 or more
Good 34-48 25-39 20-34 15-29 5-19
Average 17-33 12-24 8-19 6-14 3-4
Poor 6-16 4-11 3-7 2-5 1-2
Very Poor 6 or fewer 4 or fewer 3 or fewer 2 or fewer 1 or fewer

If you have questions or have needs regarding sports medicine in Austin or the surrounding areas, visit us at http://medinmotion.com, call or send us an email!